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HTML5 Scorecard for the New iPad, and it isn’t all good news.
This seems like a really big deal for mobile app developers so you guys especially need to read this.

whatishtml5:Sencha has released a scorecard update for the new Apple iPad, and the results are mixed.
In a nutshell, the new iPad is a mixed bag. The new iPad’s display is incredibly fine grained and web site text now appears unbelievably sharp. On the other hand, the browser experience is noticeably slower with stutters and redraws on complex web pages and web apps. Images that haven’t been updated for retina displays now appear blurry in contrast to the sharp text. iOS 5.1 doesn’t offer many new features, and it does take a step backwards. For hybrid apps (web apps packaged in a native shell), iOS 5.1 breaks localStorage and WebSQL persistence, so developers can’t rely on them anymore.
For HTML5 web developers, there is definitely some bad news here. The loss of persistent local storage is terrible for companies with hybrid apps. Sure, there are some workarounds, but Apple has made things very painful. Additionally, the step backward in performance isn’t something any web developer is happy to hear.
We’re usually effusive about the latest mobile browser and hardware from Apple. But this latest offering is a mixed bag at best and a disappointment at worst. For the last few years, we’ve grown accustomed to Apple leapfrogging the competition each year with superior hardware and even better HTML5 browser software. The latest set of Apple hardware has regressions compared to the iPad 2 including slower JavaScript performance. And with iOS 5.1, the removal (or breaking) of features that developers have trusted is a real letdown. While we believe that the iPad is still the best tablet in the market, it’s the first time a new Apple product hasn’t categorically outshone its predecessor. Particularly for business applications, there is no reason to choose the new iPad over the iPad 2.

HTML5 Scorecard for the New iPad, and it isn’t all good news.

This seems like a really big deal for mobile app developers so you guys especially need to read this.

whatishtml5:
Sencha has released a scorecard update for the new Apple iPad, and the results are mixed.

In a nutshell, the new iPad is a mixed bag. The new iPad’s display is incredibly fine grained and web site text now appears unbelievably sharp. On the other hand, the browser experience is noticeably slower with stutters and redraws on complex web pages and web apps. Images that haven’t been updated for retina displays now appear blurry in contrast to the sharp text. iOS 5.1 doesn’t offer many new features, and it does take a step backwards. For hybrid apps (web apps packaged in a native shell), iOS 5.1 breaks localStorage and WebSQL persistence, so developers can’t rely on them anymore.

For HTML5 web developers, there is definitely some bad news here. The loss of persistent local storage is terrible for companies with hybrid apps. Sure, there are some workarounds, but Apple has made things very painful. Additionally, the step backward in performance isn’t something any web developer is happy to hear.

We’re usually effusive about the latest mobile browser and hardware from Apple. But this latest offering is a mixed bag at best and a disappointment at worst. For the last few years, we’ve grown accustomed to Apple leapfrogging the competition each year with superior hardware and even better HTML5 browser software. The latest set of Apple hardware has regressions compared to the iPad 2 including slower JavaScript performance. And with iOS 5.1, the removal (or breaking) of features that developers have trusted is a real letdown. While we believe that the iPad is still the best tablet in the market, it’s the first time a new Apple product hasn’t categorically outshone its predecessor. Particularly for business applications, there is no reason to choose the new iPad over the iPad 2.
Reblogged Via: What is HTML5?

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Webshims Lib is a modular capability-based polyfill-loading library, which focuses on accurate implementations of stable HTML5 features, so that developers can write modern, interoperable and robust code in all browsers. It is built on top of jQuery and Modernizr.

Sweet. I am particularly interested in the polyfills for the audio/video and canvas. Now there are probably better, more robust individual solustions out there, but this library has all the goodies under one roof.

Reblogged Via: Front End Development - Greg Babula

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Animated CSS Mask Icons
Damn. This is cool. I’m gonna have to start a sandbox myself to start playing like this guy. You’re gonna have to view this in webkit only browers.
simurai:

Small demo of animated CSS Mask Icons. Note: It uses the non-standard CSS masks that are only implemented in WebKit without a spec. I don’t wanna go into discussing if that’s ok or not, instead I just like to experiment with them because I think you can do cool stuff and hopefully one day it will become standard.
Using CSS masks for icons would have the benefit of being able to create a large icon-set and easily swap textures, colors, shadow effects. And also animate them. Basically everything you can do with CSS backgrounds. It could also be used for other stuff like tooltips, speech bubbles, funky shaped buttons and so on.
The basics of this demo goes something like this:
Add a texture and gradients to your element’s background.
Use SVG (or PNG) as mask-image to “cut out” the rectangle into the desired shape.
Use a second shape together with mask-composite to either add  (source-over -> robot), subtract (source-out -> apple bite, cloud arrow) or intersect (xor -> cloud arrow while pressing) with the first mask.
Add some transitions/animations to the mask-position.
So ya, basically you can mask a mask, combine multiple masks or even do the opposite depending if they overlap or not. In total there are a dozen mask-composite options that I’m not quite sure what the exact difference is. I just tried them all till it worked like I wanted. ;-)
Couple notes:
Pseudo elements (highlight on the cloud) also gets masked.
CSS filters (Chrome Canary, WebKit nightly) work great with CSS masks, unlike box-shadows. See how the drop-shadow follows the contures of the SVG shape.
For better cross-browser support you could just animate multiple backgrounds (background-composite works too), but then you loose the ability to use a seamless texture.
I’m pretty sure, you could do all the effects with SVG alone. It has masks, drop-shadows, animation.. I just haven’t really dugg myself deep enough into them.
Since it uses mask-position to animate the masks, you can’t rotate them, which is a little limiting.
See demo (WebKit)

Animated CSS Mask Icons

Damn. This is cool. I’m gonna have to start a sandbox myself to start playing like this guy. You’re gonna have to view this in webkit only browers.

simurai:

Small demo of animated CSS Mask Icons. Note: It uses the non-standard CSS masks that are only implemented in WebKit without a spec. I don’t wanna go into discussing if that’s ok or not, instead I just like to experiment with them because I think you can do cool stuff and hopefully one day it will become standard.

Using CSS masks for icons would have the benefit of being able to create a large icon-set and easily swap textures, colors, shadow effects. And also animate them. Basically everything you can do with CSS backgrounds. It could also be used for other stuff like tooltips, speech bubbles, funky shaped buttons and so on.

The basics of this demo goes something like this:

  1. Add a texture and gradients to your element’s background.
  2. Use SVG (or PNG) as mask-image to “cut out” the rectangle into the desired shape.
  3. Use a second shape together with mask-composite to either add  (source-over -> robot), subtract (source-out -> apple bite, cloud arrow) or intersect (xor -> cloud arrow while pressing) with the first mask.
  4. Add some transitions/animations to the mask-position.

So ya, basically you can mask a mask, combine multiple masks or even do the opposite depending if they overlap or not. In total there are a dozen mask-composite options that I’m not quite sure what the exact difference is. I just tried them all till it worked like I wanted. ;-)

Couple notes:

  • Pseudo elements (highlight on the cloud) also gets masked.
  • CSS filters (Chrome Canary, WebKit nightly) work great with CSS masks, unlike box-shadows. See how the drop-shadow follows the contures of the SVG shape.
  • For better cross-browser support you could just animate multiple backgrounds (background-composite works too), but then you loose the ability to use a seamless texture.
  • I’m pretty sure, you could do all the effects with SVG alone. It has masks, drop-shadows, animation.. I just haven’t really dugg myself deep enough into them.
  • Since it uses mask-position to animate the masks, you can’t rotate them, which is a little limiting.

See demo (WebKit)

Reblogged Via: simurai

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Celebrating 2 years of dicking around on the internet.
And to commemorate this blogging milestone, I finally debut the 4th redesign of this blog, with a new Tumblr Avatar to boot, no more drunk party photo. I’m all class now:

I was actually suppossed to finish this like in November, but this pesky thing called a job got in my damn way. Curse my need for White Castle frozen burgers!
This is crazy though, guys. I’ve never had this long of a commitment to anything. Women. Jobs. Sobriety. I really have to give it up to Tumblr and the large community that makes maintaining this blog fun and not a chore. My followers have  grown quite a bit since I first started and I’m still amazed that people actually look at this thing.
A lot has happened since year 1.
I got a new job, I’m a full Art-Director now. I moved to Plano. I started eating ground turkey (wtf right? it’s delicious). Got an iPad. Started a podcast. Attempted to do the “Robot” to impress a girl at a bar (that not only didn’t work, but I think I saw a little hate in her eye).
But mainly I have decided that I eventually want to pursue a career in digital/interactive art-direction & design. It’s been a long journey to get to that realization but sometimes that’s just the way it’s gotta be. These side projects I work on and blog about are my mental exercises. I don’t think my interactive work is anywhere near to the level I aspire to, but I’ll sure as hell keep trying. You should like a little insecurity in your designer. Keeps ‘em honest.
Working on this latest redesign of my blog has been pretty intense, especially with the new hours I keep at my job. However, I really wanted to explore the latest web technolgies and practices out there. Besides all the fancy CSS3 you’ll see around the site, I challenged myself by making the whole damn thing responsive & fluid. I also really tried to re-design this site from the ground up. I re-skinned the Disqus comments, adding post jump navigation that follows your mouse, and added Q&A posting capabilities (now you can ask me questions). Hell I even put some thought into the post social share buttons.
This was the hardest web project I’ve ever done, mainly cause I’m a front-end web-designer, not a developer (so please forgive me if you’re looking at my javascript and css files, I really did try at first to be efficient,  haha). I had to go back to the books, do research. If you guys are interested in a list of all the scripts and web components I used to make this site work, check out my humans.txt file.
It was hard work, but it was strangely fun trying to figure this stuff out, and I feel better experience coming out of the other end the process. The minute this thing starts feeling like work is when I need to call it quits.
Holy crap I’ve been rambling. Thanks for being patient and reading this. You guys are the best. And check out the site. Spread it around like the herp. I’m done.

Celebrating 2 years of dicking around on the internet.

And to commemorate this blogging milestone, I finally debut the 4th redesign of this blog, with a new Tumblr Avatar to boot, no more drunk party photo. I’m all class now:

I was actually suppossed to finish this like in November, but this pesky thing called a job got in my damn way. Curse my need for White Castle frozen burgers!

This is crazy though, guys. I’ve never had this long of a commitment to anything. Women. Jobs. Sobriety. I really have to give it up to Tumblr and the large community that makes maintaining this blog fun and not a chore. My followers have  grown quite a bit since I first started and I’m still amazed that people actually look at this thing.

A lot has happened since year 1.

I got a new job, I’m a full Art-Director now. I moved to Plano. I started eating ground turkey (wtf right? it’s delicious). Got an iPad. Started a podcast. Attempted to do the “Robot” to impress a girl at a bar (that not only didn’t work, but I think I saw a little hate in her eye).

But mainly I have decided that I eventually want to pursue a career in digital/interactive art-direction & design. It’s been a long journey to get to that realization but sometimes that’s just the way it’s gotta be. These side projects I work on and blog about are my mental exercises. I don’t think my interactive work is anywhere near to the level I aspire to, but I’ll sure as hell keep trying. You should like a little insecurity in your designer. Keeps ‘em honest.

Working on this latest redesign of my blog has been pretty intense, especially with the new hours I keep at my job. However, I really wanted to explore the latest web technolgies and practices out there. Besides all the fancy CSS3 you’ll see around the site, I challenged myself by making the whole damn thing responsive & fluid. I also really tried to re-design this site from the ground up. I re-skinned the Disqus comments, adding post jump navigation that follows your mouse, and added Q&A posting capabilities (now you can ask me questions). Hell I even put some thought into the post social share buttons.

This was the hardest web project I’ve ever done, mainly cause I’m a front-end web-designer, not a developer (so please forgive me if you’re looking at my javascript and css files, I really did try at first to be efficient,  haha). I had to go back to the books, do research. If you guys are interested in a list of all the scripts and web components I used to make this site work, check out my humans.txt file.

It was hard work, but it was strangely fun trying to figure this stuff out, and I feel better experience coming out of the other end the process. The minute this thing starts feeling like work is when I need to call it quits.

Holy crap I’ve been rambling. Thanks for being patient and reading this. You guys are the best. And check out the site. Spread it around like the herp. I’m done.

Spread the
hotness.

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Who the hell is this guy?

Who the hell is this guy?

Oh wow, someone's actually reading this? OK, this is happening. My name is Alex and I'm a designer with slight anti-social tendencies. I'm black, live in the DFW metroplex, work at an ad agency, and drink alone in the dark on week nights. While being black, I write this blog as a creative outlet when not starting flame wars over the best episode of Battlestar Galactica (Gaeta's Uprising or The Final Five Revelation of course). I share interactive & design inspiration, the latest in pop culture, movies, and general nerdery.

I am currently unmarried and live alone. I make egg sandwiches and have no pets. I like eating tacos with no pants as well.

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